Category Archives: Ipoh

17 Hidden Food Gems You Must Try in Ipoh

Not too long ago, I wrote  a list of “15 Iconic Ipoh Foods You Must Try in Ipoh” that’ll serve well as a beginners’ guide to Ipoh food.  These foods are the most iconic and they are pretty much what everyone wants to eat when they are visiting Ipoh for the first time.  But of course Ipoh has much more to offer than these 15 things.  In this new list , I’ve put together 17 hidden food gems in Ipoh that are not too well-known by visitors but are absolutely  loved by Ipohans, and you wouldn’t want to miss these 17 incredible things to eat in Ipoh.  Continue reading

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Hongji 4 in 1 Taiwan Ginger Tea

For those of you that have been to Taiwan, you would notice that Taiwanese are very health conscious and that if you visit the super market, a stunning array of beverages for overall well-being is available.  One of the most popular ones is the Taiwan Ginger Tea (台灣薑母茶).  You would see this pretty much everywhere; whether you are strolling about in Jiufen (九份), or catching a train at the Taipei MRT station.  Continue reading

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15 Iconic Ipoh Foods You Must Try in Ipoh

When it comes to Ipoh food, it is so difficult to decide what to eat because there is just so much good food and you just want to eat everything ! I’ve picked out 15 Ipoh Foods that you absolutely must try when you visit Ipoh.  The food on this list is as iconic as KLCC is to Kuala Lumpur; and as iconic as Eiffel Tower is to Paris.   That’s how iconic they are. Continue reading

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The Concubine Lanes of Ipoh

Ipoh Old Town has undergone a makeover over the past few years (see this list of 34 Cafes in Ipoh and you would know what I mean !).  Hipster cafes and boutique hotels flourished when the old became the new fab. The Concubine Lane  (or Panglima Lima, “二奶巷” , “Er Nai xiang”) was the next to follow suit.  Other than the Concubine Lane that most people know of, there are two other related lanes in the vicinity – the Wife Lane (or Lorong Hale, “大奶巷”,”Da Nai Xiang”) and the First Concubine Lane (Market Lane, “三奶巷”, “San Nai Xiang”).   Continue reading

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